Posts Tagged ‘Architecture’

Design Details // Unusual Balconies

“Thinking outside the box” is an idea that the architects of these buildings have taken to heart. Each is an example of how an unusual balcony can be just the design detail to really distinguish an otherwise standard structure. Unexpected shapes and volumes, contrasting materials, and playful uses of color make these balconies show-stoppers! 0d09f89969f0495e44f82fb1fb147dda 41b60868f73b45f38e462f458de74a67-1
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34cd1841981033a5bc2833a4ab69cdb2 7862b6c7ed0c32023ede2838e2fcf361A quick Google search on this concept picture I pinned in 2012 makes me wonder if construction was ever completed on this luxury apartment building in Mumbai. It gives me vertigo just to think about it, but it COULD be the coolest balcony ever!
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I M A G E S // 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6

Current Project // Eichler House

I’m very excited about this project that me and the team are working on – my first involving an architecturally significant house! Joseph Eichler was a mid-century housing developer who was intent on bringing good design to the post-war masses. He built some 11,000 homes in tracts in his day. The relatively few Eichlers that remain are highly sought after for the way they epitomize Mid-Century California architecture.IMG_5626The house that I am lucky enough to be working on has all the hallmarks of the Eichler style, including a very private front that unfolds upon entry into a beautifully transparent dwelling. There is an interior atrium, and glass walls that invite the eye to travel straight through the house’s interior Living and Dining area to a sparkling pool in the backyard. A connection between the indoors and the outdoors is often something I strive for in my interiors, but in this case, Eichler and the talented architects he hired have more than done the work!IMG_5606Still, there are many things that need updating with this old house, and my client is ready to make an as yet sparsely furnished space feel much more like a home for herself and her family. A kitchen remodel (in which we kept the original foot-print) is almost complete, and room by room, we are decorating the house. IMG_5616My client has a wonderful appreciation for Mid-Century furniture and has acquired a few ,key pieces so far, but told me from the start that she didn’t want her house to look like a Mad Men set! The decorating is a mix of vintage pieces along with new furniture and rugs in a modern eclectic style.
IMG_5576Thank you to Ilse Helgen for taking these cool pictures. She gave me the “Before” pictures I asked her to snap, and then threw in some art!

Design Details // Colorful Balconies

I have been working on the complete renovation of an apartment building in Hollywood this year (pictures and details on that coming soon!), and we made a big change to the exterior by simply using color to highlight parts of the existing architecture. On my mood-board for the project were these images: A couple of very minimalist, almost institutional-looking buildings, brought to life with color. I love the way it completely breaks up the repetition of the balconies in each one. The effect is playful and commands attention.

In this building, the walls and doors of the balcony spaces have been painted in the pastel colors of candy-coated Easter eggs. Or maybe it’s a box of fresh chalk…
68a003c5f06f16bb8b9fbd03b551dbbeIn the one below of the Hard Rock Hotel in Pattaya, Thailand, each balcony is bathed in colorful light.

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These buildings remind me of the work of artists like Mondrian and Ellsworth Kelly and Sol LeWitt. The combination of austere line and exuberant color is very dear to my heart!

Photos: 1, 2,

Design Inspirer // Patrick Dougherty

Patrick Dougherty is an American sculptor whose medium is saplings! My obsession with his work began back in 2007, when he did an installation on the facade of the former Max Azria store on Melrose, titled “Just for Looks”.

 Daugherty’s installation made me imagine a landscape of neatly rolled-up hay bales, let loose by a crazy windstorm! And like a lot of people, I looked at the swirling movement he gave the saplings and thought of the clouds in Van Gogh’s Starry Night.

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Although this gorgeous sheathing of willow branches is no longer there, in my memory this remains the most fantastic storefront of all time. Thankfully, Daugherty is always hard at work, installing huge, elaborate sculptures made out of sticks all over the world.

 

Call of the Wild at the Museum of Glass in Tacoma, Washington, 2002-2003

Each work takes about three weeks to install, and involves a whole team of local volunteers, who all seem to have an incredible experience working quietly alongside the artist.

Running In Circles at the TICKON Sculpture Park in Denmark, 1996-1998

One of the things I love about Patrick Dougherty’s story is that although he had a life-long love of nature and building things, it wasn’t until he was a grad student in his late thirties that he started sculpting out of saplings. In the thirty or so years since, he has completed over 200 installations. How is that for inspiration?

Paradise Gate at Smith College in Northampton, Massachusetts, 2001

  The installations are sturdy, but being organic, they might change with the seasons and are ultimately ephemeral.

Holy Rope  at the Rinjyo-in Temple in Chiba,  Japan, 1992-1994

Fascinating, right? If you would like to know more about Patrick Dougherty and his work, visit his web-sitebuy his monograph, Stickwork, and read this wonderful 2010 profile of him from the New York Times.  Bending Sticks is a recent feature-length documentary about the artist that I can’t wait to see for more inspiration.

Photos: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6